Something For Everyone in Today’s NY Times

You’re tired. You finally had a weekend where there wasn’t much you had to do, and the invisible forces that exist to remind you that time is a manipulable concept and not a fact stole from you an hour of sleep.

This is chaff, a metaphor for something that lacks value. Don't eat it; instead, feed your mind with these articles.

This is chaff, a metaphor for something that lacks value. Don’t eat it; instead, feed your mind with these articles.

That’s messed up.

But because I care, and because I really don’t have anything better to do on a Saturday night or a Sunday morning, I have completed a recon mission and separated the wheat from the chaff of this morning’s opinion feed (not that I would know what chaff was if you pelted me with it). Here is what to read from this morning’s Sunday Review, and why to read it:

“Don’t Quote Me on This,” by Maria Konnikova
If you’re somewhere in the process of the Mrs. Dalloway essay, or if you’ve heard anything I’ve said this year about literature, you know how I feel about context (if not, here’s a reminder). Ms. Konnikova will remind you why you can’t take soundbites, such as “Liberty is precious,” at face value.

“Lodestars in a Murky Media World,” by Margaret Sullivan
My journalistas, you know how I like to preach the real-worldiness of our class. It’s probably better that you hear about the profession, its future and its foundations, from another source more authoritative than I.

“Thoughts That Can’t Be Spoken,” by Alberto Manguel
As we all know, but perhaps most acutely feel if we are sophomores trying to put together our personal poetry anthologies, the things we think often don’t translate into the things we say or write. Mr. Manguel’s experience with a stroke might give us some insight into our own mental processes.

So read, rest, and check back later today or on twitter to see if my rage about the Smarter Balanced tests has coalesced into coherent words.

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